1. psychara:

    shadowassemblage:

    Punk’s not dead, just sleeping

    AWWAWWEEEE

    (via buckytaire)

     
  2. monetizeyourcat:

    barefootmarley:

    scientific fact

    how the fuck is this true. there are many people with less than a complete human skeleton. this requires that some people have more bones than an entire skeleton, or perhaps for one person to have hundreds of millions more bones than an entire skeleton. who is he? who is he??

    (via toastoat)

     
  3.  
  4. just-for-grins:

    The awkward moment when you realize a cat takes better selfies than you … 

    (via mypocketshurt90)

     
  5.  
  6. peoplecartographer:

    time-for-maps:

    Japanese map of the world, 1708. [1512 × 676]

    This is the first time I have ever reblogged a map. (Weird, right???) More than any of the other maps I have seen on my dashboard, this one captured my imagination. As I have written before, I adore antique maps; at over 300 years old, this one easily falls in that category. The vast majority of the antique maps that I have been exposed to are European, so the fact that this was created in Asia really intrigues me. The first point I wish to make about this map is that Japan is seen in the center and is crossed by what appears to be a sort of prime meridian. (The prime meridian on most modern maps passes through England.) Furthermore, the islands that comprise Japan are much larger in this map than in more modern maps produced by the West. This placement and size of Japan suggest that the cartographers had a very Japan-centered worldview, in the same way that European mapmakers were Eurocentric. This is valuable because in recent years there has been a great deal of criticism of maps that place Europe or the United States in the center. Although such maps seem to suggest that the West is (unfairly) dominant over the rest of the world, I believe that they are merely evidence of people’s tendency to assign a disproportionate amount of importance to their home/nation. This Japanese world map is evidence of such a tendency. Another fascinating feature of the map is that countries are generally separated by water; this creates the appearance of a world entirely composed of islands. Since Japan itself is solely made up of islands, it is apparent that the Japanese cartographers did not comprehend and/or accept that the rest of the world did not follow the same pattern. This map is therefore a perfect reminder of the importance of maps in understanding the mindsets and worldviews of the people who created them and of the societies in which they arose.

    (via mypocketshurt90)

     
  7. rosettast0ned:

    Ukiyo-e Heroes is a project that recreates classic video games in the form of classical style Japanese paintings.

    (via mypocketshurt90)

     
  8. mikeyfriskeyhands:

    My brother saved this document and everytime he gets angry at our neighbours for being loud he prints it to their wireless printer and you can hear the wife shout “Why the fuck would you print this AGAIN?!” to her son.

    (via rhubabe)

     
  9. iguanamouth:

    cheppo:

    iguanamouth:

    together at last

    excuse me i have something important 2 add

    image

    image

    hes here

    (via i-am-the-pirate-queen)

     
  10. freerangeraspberries:

    alishalovescats1701:

    sixpenceee:

    sixpenceee:

    problemedic:

    plightofthevalkyries:

    sixpenceee:

    deucelooselyproductions:

    sixpenceee:

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that psychiatrists cannot reliably tell the difference between people who are mentally stable and those who are mentally unstable.

    In 1970, 8 mentally stable people were granted admission into 12 different hospitals. They all told the same story of how they would hear a voice inside their head, it was unclear but often said “empty”, “hollow” and “thud”. 

    Right after they were admitted, the patients stopped showing any signs of abnormality. They took part in activities and talked to faculty and other patients as they would normally. 

    None of the psychiatrists ever stopped to say “I think they are getting better” or “they seem absolutely fine now” In fact, nurses and psychiatrists took normal activity such as walking or writing and attempted to represent it as a form of pathological behavior. 

    For example, staff would point to patients waiting outside the lunchroom as a form of oral-acquisitive syndrome, when really they were just bored and were anticipating their meal. 

    It’s interesting to note that even though staff didn’t recognize that these people were completely fine, patients recognized that they didn’t seem to have any problems.

    This study highlights how powerful labels can be.

    SOURCE & MORE INFORMATION

    EVIL EXPERIMENT

    Wow…this also potentially bespeaks how the people who are charged with making these patients better are only trying to create terminology and atmosphere that keep them institutionalized.
    That’s pretty disturbing.

    To anyone saying “well they said they heard voices obviously the doctors are going to look at them with a weary eye”

    You missed the point.

    They were supposed to detect the patients getting better and instead of being able to tell that, they took any action that the patients performed and totally distorted it and blew it to epic proportions to make them seem completely and utterly abnormal to a point where the patients were institutionalized for months. 

    Also, sixpenceee, you missed the second part to this experiment - equally chilling, in my opinion. One hospital’s administration was angered by Rosenhan’s experiment, and challenged him to send impostor patients - mentally stable people masquerading as mentally unstable people - to their facilities. Their staff would then turn those pseudopatients away. Long story short, Rosenhan OK’d this part of the experiment. 193 people went to that hospital in that experiment period looking for help. They flagged 41 people as impostors and had doubts about another 42.

    Rosenhan sent no one.

    The staff of this hospital flagged impostor patients where none had existed.

    That’s really worrying…

    This is terrifying 

    This was conducted in 1970, so I wonder how much has changed since then

    im really interested to know…id like to think psychiatry has improved and advanced beyond this

    It hasn’t

    (via super-misfit-wolf)

     
  11. outatnight:

    crimewave420:

    erinkrystynax:

    crimewave420:

    2chaaaain:

    grates:

    please someone reassure my this is just fuckin  w people right.

    this is bullshit what the fuck

    Wait y’alls cups are really that small? holy fuck

    why the fuck anyone needs 1.3L of coke in one sitting is beyond me but anyway

    cause a nigga gets thorsty sometimes

    Yeah but how big are the fries

    (via freelancerkiwi)

     
  12.  
  13. (Source: hokeyfright, via dajo42)

     
  14. basedloner:

    this is hands down the best yahoo answers 

    (Source: yahooanswerswtf, via cakejam)

     
  15. cliffracer:

    WHEN YOU COME TO THE POINT

    THERE IS ONE MAN WAITING FOR YOU

    THE WIZARD OF THE LASER!